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20110701
20110731
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WETA 34
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
that we still have a big hole to fill. gwen: who is in that big hole? and why is it that month after month, and after month, it never seems to get more shallow? >> let's go back a little ways. a few months ago, the economy seemed to be having a nice head of steam. we were seeing very strong job growth numbers of 200,000 per month. and suddenly everything seemed to hit a wall. we've had a run of bad luck. we had very bad snowstorms earlier this year, a series of natural disasters here. the big hit came from gasoline prices that shot up to around $4 for gasoline because of the libyan rebellion. and finally the japanese earthquake and tsunami turned out to be a much bigger negative for us than we may have appreciated. because it cut off the flow of vital parts. put all those things together and it cost a lot of momentum. may very poor job numbers and in june, very poor job numbers. it was kind of surprising because in fact over the last few weeks, we had a wave of optimism because some of those tempering negatives seemed to be going away. as gasoline prices dropped and japan got back to norma
, i think first of all the president realizes we have to get a big deal. as we discussed a couple of weeks ago or last week, charlie, if you don't send the appropriate signal to international financial communities, you can raise the debt ceiling but the interest costs are going to go through the roof. so it has to be a big deal and so i think he recognizes that. and i think speaker boehner subpoena looking at the reality of what's going to happen in 2013 without agreeing to what the president said. we're going to have 4.9% increases on taxes on everybody earning er $200,000 a year anyway just from the affordabl care act. so you'll see significant increase in taxes withoutany increased taxes put on the table. i think they can do a deal and i think a deal can get done if, in fact, we do take away a lot of the tax eendires and lower the rates so thatwe get an economic boom that would come a that. so i think it's still possible. i think things tend to happen in washington when they have to so my slope that something will come togher and occur. >> rose: how long do you think it will ta
-- it has big tax increases in it and all the spending cuts will happen in the out years. well, how many times do politicians think they can pull that one over on the american people? >> reporter: the split among republicans made it difficult for party leaders to determine just what might pass the house. whatever it turns out to be, it still must be acceptable to senate democrats and ultimately to the president. this morning, the senate's majority leader democrat harry reid challenged house speaker john boehner to take matters in hand. >> right now, i'm at a point where we need to hear from the house of representatives. we've planned to go forward over here, but until we hear from the house all our work is for naught. i await word from the speaker. >> reporter: in the meantime, there's general agreement that translating the complex gang of six plan into legislation and votes before august second, is likely unrealistic. that could put the short-term emphasis back on a senate backup plan to let the president raise the debt ceiling on his own pending some final, long-term agreement. >> ifil
of either of our two parties right now. and i think that is the big challenge right now. how do we basically develop a political platform and a mandate to do those four things. >> i would add a couple things. to what tom said which i basically agree with. but first there is a cultural element here. it's not just a problem in washington, it's a pblem in the culture. a nation where people have distrust of authority, don't trust government, unwilling to accept sacrice, feel very threatened, want pore government than they are willing to pay for, and so there has to be a gigantic education campaign to go under that. and then the second thing i would add, and tom talked about a hybrid politics, i uld say we'vead it. and we just have to rediscover it. and i go back perpeally to my hero alex aner hamilton who created this hrid politics it was not -- he got us out of the big government versus small government debat he stood for lited b energetic government to enhance social mobility. so people in the hamiltonian practise decision which include the wig party and the lincoln an republican party at the
, materials. >> that money could make a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: high-level democrats and republicans alike said today's meeting at the white house marked the beginning of the end game in reaching a final deal on deficit reduction. the president and congressional leaders convened in the white house cabinet room, amid talk of a grand bargain involving social security, medicare and tax reform. when it was over, mr. obama made an unscheduled appearance in the briefing room. >> i thought it was a very constructive meeting. people were frank. we discussed the various options available to us. everybody re-confirmed the importance of completing our work and raising the debt limit ceiling so that the full faith and
exposure to italian paper. even american banks have almost $300 billion. is italy too big to fail? >> well, certainly it is. i mean, if you have to think about a rescue package for italy no one today has the money to put it up. i mean, let's face it, as you said before, italy is six times the size of greece. so i think that everybody should be quite calm. today the markets were doing much better. it's true, as ken was saying before, part of the confusion arose because of a fight over an internal political fight between berlusconi and finance minister tremonte. but the decree for a large austerity plan was already passed. and it was because of this fight that the markets feared that maybe this decree was not going to be approved by parliament. today the situation has been clarified. by friday this package will be passed and, you know, italy is going to go on by adopting this plan and by 2014 it will have a balanced budget which is going to be quite an enviable situation if all of this will go according to plan. >> suarez: professor rogoff, the news of the austerity plan seemed to have calme
, to the red, white, and blue. in the big apple and elsewhere, the day will end with the usual bursts of color, lighting the night sky-- a once-a-year moment, cherished by millions. but, in some places, this year, the sky will be silent. raging wildfires and dry weather in arizona, new mexico, and texas have forced authorities to cancel fourth of july fireworks in certain areas. >> a lot of people are going to be really disappointed, i thinkç >> woodruff: the patriotic spirit isn't felt only in the united states. these u.s. soldiers stationed in southeastern afghanistan held a flag raising ceremony to commemorate the 4th. and at kandahar airfield general david petraeus spent his last independence day as commander of u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, with the troops. petraeus set to take up his new job as c.i.a. director later this year, today administered the oath of re-enlistment to 235 service members.çç >> you can really feel the honor, especially when you get a general like general petreas come down and do it for us. it makes it really feel a lot more important to me. it'll be nice
a big difference to a lot of people. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the debt ceiling deadlock in washington led to increasingly urgent appeals for action today. but even as talks resumed, white house officials warned not to expect a hallelujah moment. fresh alarms sounded on wall street and around the world today about the consequences of a potential u.s. government default. standard & poors joined moody's in warning the country's credit rating could be downgraded, if the government tries to pay just the interest on its debt. and china said it hopes the u.s. adopts responsible policies. the chinese hold more than $1 trillion in u.s. debt, more than any other foreign creditor. at a senate hearing, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke-- t
to use. now, you can do a skype video chat or call without leaving facebook. this is big for facebook. this is not so revolutionary for the users. >> are these the kind people that actually want to have video chat and video conferences? i thought that was more of a work scenario. >> with any audience, this kind of a video chat behavior is for the minority of your interactions because if you are in a certain place, once you introduce visual and audio cues, you have to have a controlled environment. i cannot have a video chat with you while i'm on the bus. this is by definition a rich interface for a minority of your communications. nonetheless, they spoke with like this to happen within facebook and not have you leave facebook and have you use your skype program. >> one thing that seems to be clear is that the business side, this comes in the same week that google has announced its social network is try to take on facebook as well. who was winning that battle? >> if you measure this on sheer numbers, no one touches facebook. during the announcement, they mentioned they have 750 million
think this contagion is going to spread? >> italy and spain are the big ones. it is impossible for the rest of the euro zone. it is too big. you would have to end up with the european central bank owning an enormous chunk. it becomes really serious. that looks like possibilities. the euro zone is running a out of countries to finance. >> turning to this country, here in the states, congress has its own budget crisis. if it does, what impact is the point to have on world markets? it is ironic that the u.s. is the most creditworthy countries in the world. that is almost voluntarily, the cutting default when it does the have to. if it did, that would create chaos throughout the global financial system. >> thank you very much for joining us. you are watching "bbc world news america." rare world elements are rare. u.s. is seeking a production into high gear. in moscow today, the celebrations were under way for the anniversary of the cathedral. on the edge of rex -- that of red square, it has then restored to its glory. >> the unique, st. basil's cathedral. bill during the era of iva
on the show time series the big c. here's a look at that series. >> the doctor. oh, pardon me, sir. dr. sherman, hi. my name's kathy. >> i'm the nurse. >> you're not a drug rap, are you? >> no, no, i'm not. i'm a dying woman who is trying to see the right doctor and ask him if he s any advice on how to save my life. the best i can do is spend the last two hours a day on hold from your office to find out if anyone's canceled. that's not okay. >> i'm going to asyou to leave. >> i will not leave. >> charlie: the big c is currently airing on show time mondays at 10:30 p.m. i'm pleased to have laura lean -- laura linney back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. >> charlie: when you look at that, what do you think? >> it's a weird, you know sort of tapestry of what you feel and i always feel slightly embarrassed when i look at myself. >> charlie: really? you don't look at this clinically and say i can't wait to have somebody watch it. >> i also good off camera. i give performances off camera to people who would never -- i mean, on camera i try my best. but there's, the further i get awa
planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: much talk, but little movement: the high-stakes debt and deficit impasse continued today, and last night's dueling primetime speeches by president obama and speaker boehner only seemed to reinforce the bitter stalemate over raising the country's borrowing limit. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: it was house speaker john boehner who had the last word
think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: another blistering forecast greeted millions of americans today. the unrelenting hot weather broke a series of records, and triggered warnings in state after state. >> judging by the -- large portions of the country the sweating is way from over with temperatures over 100 degrees and above. >> how hot do you think it is. >> 109. >> in wichita, a high yesterday of 111 degrees, breaking a record set in 1982. it was expected to hit 103 today, the 20th straight day of t
a big prize from the failure of the takeover. bskyb's share prices falling around 20% over the past nine days. taking away almost 3 billion pounds from the value of the company. what has rupert murdoch lost? >> this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to acquire 100% of the business which is extraordinarily good prospects, which has a growth trajectory which is well understood. it would have substantially increased the size of the company from around 20% to 25%. >> we may think mr. murdoch is big in the u.k., but he is much bigger in the u.s. the worry for him is that u.s. senators are now on his days following the accusation that 9/11 victims and other families phones or hacked. >> if that is true and if there was any access to any of the victims records, then, you know, in my mind, it would probably be the most invasive and perverse information in's the final moments of their lives and a tremendous innovation to their families as well. >> 1989, the dawn of television's new age. >> mr. murdoch would see himself, rightly many would say, as the founder of bskyb. so to be told by politicia
of reasons for this we can discuss-- is as high as it's been. >> rose: so that's really one of the big questions. >> in europe it's the same thing. >> rose: u.s. leadership. >> yeah. >> rose: what is it you thi they expect from the united states in 2011 and twelve after all that's taken place? the economic collapse that we had. the wars we were engaged in and two that we are still engaged in in different levels. what does the world want from america? >> well, leadersh, i think, is the short answer to the question. but we can start with asia and go to europe and go to the middle east. in asia, they want the ited states to be present. they wanthe united states that ey can count on to meet its obligations anpromises t ales and partners, and we have been doing that. you know, this is a mistake... not mistake. it's not a coincidence that secretary clinton took her first trip as secretary of state to asia. >> rose: and she's back in india as we speak. since dean rusk in 1961. and we have really engaged... they want u.s. presence. i think the asians want to see the unitedtates engaged and, by
to take on our deficit is with a balanced approach. one where the wealthiest americans and big corporations pay their fair share too. >> reporter: meanwhile the leader of the democratic majority in the senate, harry reid, has been working on a competing proposal. it would raise the debt ceiling and cut $2.7 trillion in spending. the savings would come from federal agencies and defense spending but avoid controversial changes to entitlement programs and the u.s. tax code. >> so now all the republicans have to do is say yes. unfortunately, the republicans who used to run the congress on the caucuses are being driven by the radical, right wing that is so in tune with the tea party. they want their leaders to ignore the american people as they're doing. they want their leaders to ignore the business leaders like the chamber of commerce that they're ignoring. and even a majority of republicans around this country want something to happen and they're refusing to do that. >> reporter: this afternoon reid's plan got official endorsement from the white house spokesman describing it as a
to create the next big thing? but make sure that production is here. >> brown: it was the third such social media event for the president this year. in april, he took part in a town hall hosted by facebook, and in january, he answered video questions submitted via youtube. for the president and other politicians and leaders, twitter especially has become an increasingly essential communications tool. republican mitt romney used the service in early june to announce to his followers he was running for president. and then, to keep them in the loop about campaign events. and with more than half a million followers, former vice presidential candidate sarah palin is a frequent user, sometimes posting multiple times a day. but there are also cautionary tales including, most recently, congressman anthony weiner, whose tweeted sexual messages and photos opened him to ridicule and ended in his resignation. >> now, our next question comes from someone you may know-- this is speaker boehner. >> oh, there you go. ( laughter ) >> brown: as for today's town hall, some of the president's political opponen
for the hearts and minds of the people. >> big. there you go. >> the overriding goal of counterinsurgency is to make friends. you make friends with the people; you isolate the insurgents. go where the people are. go where the population is. go to the population centers. get in among the people, protect the people, isolate the insurgents. >> narrator: but according to those close to the military command, counterinsurgency also involves hunting down the enemy. ( shouting ) >> clear. >> let's go, let's go, let's go! >> counterinsurgency doctrine believes in killing people. it just believes in killing the right people. and what's happened over the past five years is we've gotten far, far better at correlating human intelligence and signals intelligence to paint a very tight, coherent picture of who the enemy is and where the enemy hangs his hat. and we've gotten better at using precision firepower to give those people very, very bad days. ( glass breaking ) and i really think that this is redefining what counterinsurgency means in the 21st century. ( explosion ) >> narrator: overseeing the co
't you going against the policy that's in place where you're at?" >> smith: manning was taking a big risk. under the army's "don't ask, don't tell" rules, gay soldiers, like manning, were required to keep their sexual orientation secret. his friends also worried about his political activism. >> in his facebook profile, he posted signs and pictures at his presence at rallies. >> smith: gay rights rallies? >> right. this struck me as very dangerous to his position. i mean, i admired him for his... you know, for his courage on this, but i thought it might be a little bit foolhardy. >> smith: during this period, manning also started a relationship with a young man from upstate new york named tyler watkins. on weekends, bradley would visit him in boston, where watkins was studying. during those trips, the young intelligence analyst also found a new group of friends, computer science students and hackers. at the time, wikileaks was already making headlines, and julian assange was an admired figure among hackers. boston opened new doors for manning, but he had a problem back on base. >> he thoug
, the big difference between them... >>. >> rose: she was more hard line than he was and it'said she is even today in the councils of government. that she was more allied with bob gates than she was... >> yeah, that was the big difference during the campaign between them and that was what got oba doing soell in iowa was his rly opposition. >> rose: she supported the war even though it was just based on a speech that he'd written. so the last question is what's it going to take so that this is no longer true? >> think that it's going to be with us, charlie, for a very, very long time. and the reason i say that is that as the years go by it isn't that apresident has to think about vietnam, because vietnam has now insinuated itself int the d.n.a. of every presidt. now you think of code words. you think out having a clear exit strategy. >> rose: right. >> of giving clear instructions to the military. what are you really saying? you're really saying "i don't want another vietnam," but you don't articulate the word. you live the thought, the very essence of it. and that essence is now deeply embed
much and british officers say privately they are -- there is still a big problem with corruption. nato's deployment has peaked. the question now is will the afghans be able to do the job of the british soldiers have been doing as they start to leave? >> that is the question indeed. on the ground, the fighting continues. in washington, three american senators, three -- two democrats and one republican pended op-ed in the "new york times" which called for a more rapid withdrawal of all american combat troops. tom udall is among those arguing the case. thank you for joining me. you criticize president obama for not bringing back american troops fast enough from afghanistan. what would you like him to do? >> the thing we have to realize is the thing we went in with objectives. those objectives were displacing a government that was harboring terrorists. terrorist camps, al qaeda was hooked up with them, and osama bin laden was in the region. now we have an elected government, we have completely changed the landscape, we have trained approximately 400,000 afghans in terms of army and police.
the united states went into iraq in 2003, 2004, they appointed a viceroy, jerry bremer, who made four big decisions right away. can you run down those decisions and what was the aftermath of those decisions? >> the decisions had to do with this bending the army, outlined -- disbanding the army, putting thousands out on the streets without jobs. he united men with guns with men with ideas, fighting -- feeding into the insurgency. >> so that party was out. the police were out, the army was out. there was some kind of nationalization of industries or something like that? >> again, trying to get rid of the state-and entities to make it more efficient. >> and there were no state-run entities? >> there was a virtual government that did not have much of 40 -- much authority . >> what is the definition of insurgency? >> people have different definitions. in the case of iraq, it was forces opposed to the government taking up arms and using violence. that is certainly what we saw there, primarily by the sunni tribes. the chaos in iraq provided the opportunity for al qaeda to move in. so you had thi
, but charle'' point is right. this is tiny, tiny little drops in a big ocean. it is not plan to solve the problem to go after corporate jets or even to go after the hedge fund guys, although i would sure like to. they have got to raise revenues, i hate to say it, on the middle class. everybody -- this is the point that gets lost in this -- everybody is in this boat. there is no way out, as every american does something. >> raise revenues on the shrinking middle class, mark. >> evan is right, because it is going to affect everybody. evan addressed the possibility of defaults. when that happens, the federal government of the united states, which borrows 40 cents of every dollar we spend every single day, is faced with the option, do you pay a sergeant in combat in kandahar, a grandmother in a 1-bedroom apartment, a social security check, or do you meet the obligations of the bankers who are holding their debt in beijing and beverly hills? the answer is simple. the prior claim is on the second group. the reality that we are contending with -- what the president is proposing is increasing
speaking, it's a big blow for the karzai administration. you know, it'sçç confidant, relatives, high-level aides going back into april some of them are being killed. but more than who is doing it or who it's happening to, i would put it altogether by saying it's a real danger for the stability of the government and it makes it seem as if as the americans and nato begin to pull out, it's really not clear who is in control. it's really not clear where these chips are going to fall. >> you wrote aboutç that ioç oe of the recent pieces for the post that the tenor of kabul is changing. people seem to be preparing for that day when the last u.s. troops are out of there and trying to figure out where the power is going to be. >> exactly. people are very nervous and scared. the last time a super power was involved in afghanistan and suddenly left, which was of course the soviet union in 1989, it wasn't long after that that civil wary rupted which was incredibly vicious and destructive and destroyed much of the capital. nobody thinks that's going to happen now but they're worriedç that s
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)